Financial Resolution No. 2: Excise (Mechanically Propelled Vehicles)

Tuesday, 6 December 2011

Dáil Éireann Debate
Vol. 748 No. 6

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The Taoiseach: Information on Enda Kenny  Zoom on Enda Kenny  I move:

(1) THAT in this Resolution —

[906]

(2) THAT as respects licences under section 1 of the Act of 1952 taken out for periods beginning on or after 1 January 2012, the Schedule (as amended by section 3 of, and the Schedule to, the Act of 2008) to the Act of 1952 be amended by substituting the following for Part I of that Schedule:

“PART I
1. Vehicles of the following descriptions not exceeding 500 kilograms in weight unladen:
(a) bicycles (other than bicycles which are electrically propelled), or tricycles (other than tricycles neither constructed nor adapted for use nor used for the carriage of a passenger), of which the cylinder capacity of the engine—
(i) does not exceed 75 cubic centimetres €46
(ii) exceeds 75 cubic centimetres but does not exceed 200 cubic centimetres €62
(iii) exceeds 200 cubic centimetres, €82
(b) bicycles or tricycles which are electrically propelled, €33
(c) vehicles with three or more wheels neither constructed nor adapted for use nor used for the carriage of a driver or passenger €82.
2. (a) Vehicles (commonly known as dumpers) not exceeding 3 metres cubed in capacity, level loaded, designed and constructed for use on sites of construction works (including road construction and house and other building works) for the purpose of conveying concrete, rubble, earth or other like material where the person taking out the licence shows to the satisfaction of the licensing authority that the vehicle is used mainly on such sites, and on public roads only —
(i) for the purpose of proceeding to and from the site where it is to be used, and when so proceeding neither carries nor hauls any load other than such as is necessary for its propulsion or equipment, or
(ii) for the purpose of conveying concrete, rubble, earth or like material for a distance of not more than one kilometre to and from any such site, €95
(b) Vehicles (commonly known as off-road dumpers) exceeding 3 metres cubed in capacity, level loaded, designed and constructed primarily for use on sites of construction works (including road construction and house and other building works) for the purpose of conveying concrete, rubble, earth or other like material and incapable by reason of their design and construction of exceeding a speed of 55 kilometres per hour on a level road under their own power and which are the subject of special permits under the Road Traffic (Special Permits for Particular Vehicles) Regulations 2007 (S.I. No. 283 of 2007), €823
(c) Any vehicle (other than a vehicle constructed or adapted for use and used for the conveyance of a machine, workshop, contrivance or implement, by or in which goods being conveyed by such vehicle are processed or manufactured while the vehicle is in motion) constructed or adapted for use and used only for the conveyance of a machine, workshop, contrivance or implement (being a machine, workshop, contrivance or implement which is built in as part of the vehicle or otherwise permanently attached thereto) and no other load except articles used in connection with such machine, workshop, contrivance or implement or goods processed or manufactured therein including any vehicle (commonly known as a recovery vehicle) constructed or permanently adapted for the purposes of lifting, towing and transporting a disabled vehicle or for any one or more of those purposes, €310
(d) Vehicles (commonly known as forklift trucks) designed and constructed for the purpose of loading and unloading goods where the person taking out the licence shows to the satisfaction of the licensing authority that the vehicle is used on public roads only—
(i) for the purpose of proceeding to and from the site where it is to be used for loading and unloading, and when so proceeding neither carries nor hauls any load other than such as is necessary for its propulsion or equipment, or
(ii) as part of the process of loading or unloading, for the purpose of conveying goods for a distance of not more than one kilometre to and from the site where it is loading or unloading €95.
3. (a) Vehicles constructed or adapted for the carriage of more than 8 persons which are owned by a youth or community organisation and which are used exclusively by the organisation solely for the purpose of conveying persons on journeys directly related to the activities of the organisation and which have seating capacity for—
(i) more than 8 persons but not more than 20 persons €143
(ii) more than 20 persons but not more than 40 persons €188
(iii) more than 40 persons but not more than 60 persons €375
(iv) more than 60 persons, €375
(b)Vehicles (other than those referred to in subparagraph (c) of this paragraph) used as large public service vehicles within the meaning of the Road Traffic Act 1961, and having seating capacity for—
(i) more than 8 persons but not more than 20 persons €143
(ii) more than 20 persons but not more than 40 persons €188
(iii) more than 40 persons but not more than 60 persons €375
(iv) more than 60 persons, €375
(c) Vehicles which are large public service vehicles within the meaning of the Road Traffic Act 1961, and which are used only for the carriage of children, or children and teachers, being carried to or from school or to or from school-related physical education activities, and are either licensed under Article 60 of the Road Traffic (Public Service Vehicles) Regulations 1963 (S.I. No. 191 of 1963) as amended, or owned or operated by a statutory transport undertaking €88.
4. Vehicles of the following descriptions:
(a) vehicles designed, constructed and used for the purpose of trench digging or any kind of excavating or shovelling work which—
(i) are used on public roads only for that purpose or the purpose of proceeding to and from the place where they are to be used for that purpose, and
(ii) when so proceeding neither carry nor haul any load other than such as is necessary for their propulsion or equipment, €95
(b) tractors (being tractors designed and constructed primarily for use otherwise than on roads and incapable by reason of their construction of exceeding a speed of 50 kilometres per hour on a level road under their own power) and agricultural engines, not being tractors or engines used for hauling on roads any objects except their own necessary gear, threshing appliances, farming implements or supplies of fuel or water required for the purposes of the vehicles or agricultural purposes, €95
(c) tractors (being tractors designed and constructed primarily for use otherwise than on roads and incapable by reason of their construction of exceeding a speed of 50 kilometres per hour on a level road under their own power and not being tractors in respect of which a duty is chargeable at the rate specified in subparagraph (b) of this paragraph) which are used for haulage in connection with agriculture and for no other purpose, €95
where a tractor is fitted with a detachable platform, container or implement (being a platform, container or implement used primarily for farm work), goods or burden of any other description conveyed on or in the platform, container or implement shall be regarded for the purposes of this subparagraph as being hauled by the tractor,
(d) tractors of any other description, €310
(e) vehicles designed, constructed or adapted as motor caravans (within the meaning of section 130 of the Finance Act 1992), €95
(f) vehicles which are kept and used exclusively on an offshore island to which there is no direct road or bridge access from the mainland €95
5. Vehicles (including tricycles weighing more than 500 kilograms unladen) constructed or adapted for use and used for the conveyance of goods or burden of any other description in the course of trade or business (including agriculture and the performance by a local or public authority of its functions) and vehicles constructed or adapted for use and used for the conveyance of a machine, workshop, contrivance or implement by or in which goods being conveyed by such vehicles are processed or manufactured while the vehicles are in motion:
(a) being vehicles which are electrically propelled and which do not exceed 1,500 kilograms in weight unladen, €86
(b) being vehicles which are not such electrically propelled vehicles as aforesaid and which have a weight unladen—
(i) not exceeding 3,000 kilograms, €310
(ii) exceeding 3,000 kilograms but not exceeding 4,000 kilograms, €391
(iii) exceeding 4,000 kilograms but not exceeding 5,000 kilograms, €505
(iv) exceeding 5,000 kilograms but not exceeding 6,000 kilograms, €700
(v) exceeding 6,000 kilograms but not exceeding 7,000 kilograms, €948
(vi) exceeding 7,000 kilograms but not exceeding 8,000 kilograms, €1,193
(vii) exceeding 8,000 kilograms but not exceeding 20,000 kilograms, €1,193 plus €281 for each 1,000 kilograms or part thereof in excess of 8,000 kilograms
(viii) exceeding 20,000 kilograms €4,833.
6. Vehicles other than those charged with duty under the foregoing provisions of this Part of this Schedule:
(a)any vehicle which is used as a hearse and for no other purpose, €95
(b) any vehicle (excluding a taxi) which is used as a small public service vehicle within the meaning of the Road Traffic Act 1961, and for no other purpose, €88
(c) any vehicle which is fitted with a taximeter and is lawfully used as a street service vehicle within the meaning of the Road Traffic Act 1961, and for purposes incidental to such use and for no other purpose, €88
(d) any vehicle which is—
(i) a new vehicle which is registered on or after 1 July 2008 under section 131 of the Finance Act 1992 as a category A vehicle or a category M1 vehicle, as the case may be, or
(ii) registered outside of the State on or after 1 January 2008 and which is subsequently registered in the State on or after 1 July 2008 under section 131 of the Finance Act 1992 as a category A vehicle or a category M1 vehicle, as the case may be, and which has an identification mark assigned by the Revenue Commissioners under section 131(5) of the Finance Act 1992 which signifies that the vehicle was first brought into use during or after the year 2008, and which has a CO2 emissions level—
(I) not exceeding 120 grams per kilometre, €160
(II) exceeding 120 grams per kilometre but not exceeding 140 grams per kilometre, €225
(III) exceeding 140 grams per kilometre but not exceeding 155 grams per kilometre, €330
(IV) exceeding 155 grams per kilometre but not exceeding 170 grams per kilometre, €481
(V) exceeding 170 grams per kilometre but not exceeding 190 grams per kilometre, €677
(VI) exceeding 190 grams per kilometre but not exceeding 225 grams per kilometre, €1,129
(VII) exceeding 225 grams per kilometre, €2,258
(VIII) that—
(A) cannot be confirmed by the Revenue Commissioners by reference to the relevant EC type-approval certificate or EC certificate of conformity, and
(B) the Revenue Commissioners are not satisfied of by reference to any other document produced in support of the declaration for registration pursuant to section 131 of the Finance Act 1992, €2,258
(e) subject to subparagraph (f), other vehicles to which this paragraph applies and which—
(i) have an engine capacity not exceeding 1,000 cubic centimetres, €185
(ii) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,000 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,100 cubic centimetres, €278
(iii) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,100 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,200 cubic centimetres, €307
(iv) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,200 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,300 cubic centimetres, €333
(v) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,300 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,400 cubic centimetres, €358
(vi) have an engine capacityexceeding 1,400 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,500 cubic centimetres, €384
(vii) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,500 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,600 cubic centimetres, €478
(viii) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,600 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,700 cubic centimetres, €506
(ix) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,700 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,800 cubic centimetres, €592
(x) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,800 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 1,900 cubic centimetres, €626
(xi) have an engine capacity exceeding 1,900 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,000 cubic centimetres, €660
(xii) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,000 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,100 cubic centimetres, €843
(xiii) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,100 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,200 cubic centimetres, €885
(xiv) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,200 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,300 cubic centimetres, €925
(xv) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,300 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,400 cubic centimetres, €962
(xvi) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,400 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,500 cubic centimetres, €1,005
(xvii) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,500 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,600 cubic centimetres, €1,204
(xviii) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,600 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,700 cubic centimetres, €1,251
(xix) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,700 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,800 cubic centimetres, €1,294
(xx) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,800 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 2,900 cubic centimetres, €1,342
(xxi) have an engine capacity exceeding 2,900 cubic centimetres but not exceeding 3,000 cubic centimetres, €1,390
(xxii) have an engine capacity exceeding 3,000 cubic centimetres, €1,683
(xxiii) is electrically propelled, €157
(f) where a vehicle mentioned in subparagraph (e) which at the time of registration—
(i) was a new vehicle registered under section 131 of the Finance Act 1992 as a category A vehicle during the period beginning on 1 January 2008 and ending on 30 June 2008, and
(ii) in respect of which the rate of duty that would have applied to it under subparagraph (d)(i), if that subparagraph had been in operation when it was so registered and had applied to it, is less that the rate of duty specified in relation to it in subparagraph (e), then, the rate of duty as respects that vehicle for licences taken out on or after 1 July 2008 for periods beginning on or after that date shall be the rate of duty specified in subparagraph (d),
(g) where a vehicle was registered outside of the State during the period beginning on 1 January 2008 and ending on 30 June 2008 and is subsequently registered in the State on or after 1 January 2008 under section 131of the Finance Act 1992 as a category A vehicle or a category M1 vehicle, as the case may be, and which has an identification mark assigned by the Revenue Commissioners under section 131(5) of the Finance Act 1992 which signifies that the vehicle was first brought into use during the year 2008, then, notwithstanding any other provision of this paragraph, the rate of duty as respects that vehicle for licences taken out on or after 1 July 2008 for periods beginning on or after that date shall be chargeable at the lower of the rates of duty for the vehicle under subparagraph (d) or (e).”.

[910]

This resolution provides for the amendment of the Finance (Excise Duties) (Vehicles) Act 1952 and the Finance (No. 2) Act 1992, as extended by the Motor Vehicle (Duties and Licences) Acts 2008 in relation to rates of motor tax and fees for trade licence plates. I draw the attention of the House to a typographical error on page 4, section (3)(b)(iii) which should read “more” rather than “ntmore”.

The proposed increases announced today, the first in three years, are for 7.5% across most categories of vehicle. In the case of CO2 bands A-C flat rate increases apply. Band A increases from €104 to €160, band B from €156 to €225 and band C from €302 to €330. Trade plate licences will also increase by 7.5%. The new rates will apply to motor tax discs and trade licences taken out from tonight for periods beginning on or after 1 January 2012. The levels of increase in the lower CO2 bands are higher in percentage terms than the rest of the fleet, but must be viewed against a structure that left the bottom rates very low. It is also important to note that the structure of the banding and rates have not been changed and there remains a positive incentive to purchase low-CO2 cars.

While the introduction of the CO2 bands was designed to encourage a switch to lower emission vehicles, the changes were introduced on a second principle of revenue neutrality. It has always been the intention that the motor taxation system be kept under review to ensure that it meets the twin objectives of the CO2 system. The reality is that there has been a significant loss of motor tax income in recent years, as the number of vehicles taxed on the basis of CO2[911]emissions has increased by about 5% year on year. At the end of October, the CO2 fleet of 333,634 cars comprised 17.6% of all cars on the road. Of these, more than 294,000 are taxed at the three lowest bands. While this is welcome from an environmental perspective, it represented an increasing loss to the local government fund, receipts having been reduced from €1,060 million in 2008 to €1,024 million last year. It is estimated that income for this year would be in the region of €998 million if no increases in rates were applied.

It is important to note that the proceeds from motor tax have hitherto paid into the local government fund to support the funding of local authorities. The fund is used predominately to finance non-national roads and the general purpose needs of local authorities. However, in this instance, the increase in income from the proposed rate increases will go directly to the Exchequer. This is an immediate and necessary measure towards the reduction of the national debt. I should stress that the local government fund will retain the income from the existing rates of motor tax. The Government is committed to supporting the local government fund and it is proposed that the income from the introduction of the household charge will be directed to the fund.

It is anticipated that the proposed increases will raise some €47 million for the Exchequer over a full year. Any broader or longer-term changes to the motor taxation system will be considered as part of the review of the carbon banding of VRT and motor tax that will commence next year. It is my intention that the twin priorities of ensuring the protection of the tax base and the positive environmental impact of the existing basis of taxation will be carried through to the future.

This Financial Resolution will cease on the enactment of the relevant Bill, which will be presented to the House at the earliest possible date.

Deputy Niall Collins: Information on Niall Collins  Zoom on Niall Collins  Fianna Fáil opposes this resolution, which makes minimum financial sense and no environmental sense. The Government is tinkering around and adjusting the bands in respect of low emission cars, which have proven to be an outstanding success in terms of addressing issues such as climate change. The Government has been remiss in terms of addressing climate change. Despite that the issue is referred to in the programme for Government, Government has resiled from publishing any legislation or dealing with it on a comprehensive basis.

Also, the other measures in relation to car tax are anti-rural. Cars in rural Ireland are not a luxury, rather they are a necessity to allow people to get on with their everyday lives. This measure coupled with other issues such as the closure of Garda Stations, small schools, community and district hospitals, attacks on disadvantaged area aid to farmers, VAT on petrol——

An Ceann Comhairle: Information on Seán Barrett  Zoom on Seán Barrett  The Deputy must speak only to the motion.

Deputy Niall Collins: Information on Niall Collins  Zoom on Niall Collins  ——septic tank charges, cutbacks in school transport and increases in college fees will impact on rural Ireland. The Government is not focusing on climate change. It is hitting people in terms of transport, which is required to keep the economy moving.

Deputy Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin: Information on Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin  Zoom on Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin  Sinn Féin also opposes this proposal. It must recognised that once again that an easy option has been chosen by this Government. It is targeting motorists, not alone with this proposal in relation to motor tax but in terms of Financial Resolution No. 3, which deals with increases in excise duties on petrol and diesel. This is outrageous. There is no public transport provision across rural Ireland. People are dependant on a motor vehicle to access work. Work is crucial. This is akin to a tax on accessing one’s employment. It must be seen in that reality. It is penal and totally unacceptable. We must view this in terms of its [912]impact on transport costs. Any increase in terms of the transportation of goods and services will result in increased cost to the consumer. This is a regressive proposition, which does nothing to aid any turn in the economic condition with which we are currently coping. I vehemently oppose this resolution and ask that the Government withdraw it.

  8 o’clock

Deputy Mattie McGrath: Information on Mattie McGrath  Zoom on Mattie McGrath  I also wish to voice my opposition to this measure. As other speakers have noted, it is completely anti-rural and is completely hostile to the green environment. I was one of the backbenchers who approached the late Brian Lenihan to introduce the scrappage scheme and I note this measure is completely anti-business. Moreover, a tax on trade plates is imminent. This measure constitutes a breach of faith with the hundreds of thousands of people who bought cars with lower emissions. While they may have availed of lower tax rates, they were encouraged to so do. This represents another body blow and another kick in the teeth for Joe Public and the ordinary voters to whom the Government made so many promises. They acted in good faith on foot of the previous Government’s initiative but this now has been thrown in their faces. Consequently, I oppose the measure.

Deputy Thomas Pringle: Information on Thomas Pringle  Zoom on Thomas Pringle  I also wish to oppose the proposed increase in car tax. It is a regressive measure, particularly in the constituency I represent, in which people are forced to travel to try to find work. However, the Government now proposes to increase the burden of taxation on them to make it more difficult for them. In a county such as Donegal that has virtually no public transport, cars are not a luxury. They are necessary for those who wish to try to find work or to improve their position but the Government is forcing this measure on them. Moreover, to add insult to injury, while car tax used to go towards funding local government, the proposal to add €47 million as a debt reduction measure is a waste of time that would not even meet a percentage point on the interest rates. This is an extremely regressive measure to which I am fully opposed.

Deputy Micheál Martin: Information on Micheál Martin  Zoom on Micheál Martin  Fianna Fáil is opposing this measure because of its lack of balance. While the Government is obliged to collect revenue, this is an extraordinary decision. In essence, a ground-breaking scheme, the purpose of which was to redirect people to purchase clean cars in order to improve the environment and to facilitate a sustainable environment in the future, has been declared a success. However, because it has been declared a success, it now is proposed to change it essentially to disincentivise people from buying cleaner cars and to incentivise them to buy dirtier cars in respect of emissions. In essence, this is the proposition that has emanated from the Government. Moreover, this action reflects a broader disdain for the climate change agenda by the Government, as well as a disdain in respect of environmental sustainability. Nothing else explains this decision, other than that broad philosophy that has underpinned the Government’s present approach.

When one considers the climate change agenda and the environmental issue, the sector that is causing Ireland the greatest challenges, and will continue to so do in the future, is the transport sector. As I sat around the Cabinet sub-committee on climate change, time and time again it was the transport sector that presented enormous challenges in meeting the Kyoto obligations or any subsequent European Union CO2 emission targets to which Ireland had signed up. This measure flies in the face of all the evidence on CO2 emissions and the efforts to improve Ireland’s position in respect of the transport sector in particular, as well as the broader environmental agenda. The measure also constitutes a betrayal of those people who took the Government and the State in good faith and who purchased cars with lower CO2 emissions. I acknowledge it was the Government of the day but there are some matters about which there should be a sense of honour and obligation to people.

[913]Deputy Mattie McGrath: Information on Mattie McGrath  Zoom on Mattie McGrath  Hear, hear.

Deputy Micheál Martin: Information on Micheál Martin  Zoom on Micheál Martin  If, two or three years ago, a Government told people to buy cars with lower emissions because it was the right thing for the environment and that it would incentivise them to do so and if a subsequent Government reverses the decision two years later and states it did not really mean it, essentially, those people will have been conned into taking decisions. It is an act of treachery by the State towards people, as well as a lack of faith. When this happens, no one will believe any Government from year to year with regard to fiscal or taxation measures it might introduce.

Deputy Mattie McGrath: Information on Mattie McGrath  Zoom on Mattie McGrath  Hear, hear.

Deputy Micheál Martin: Information on Micheál Martin  Zoom on Micheál Martin  The Taoiseach may smirk or nod and so on but it is a serious issue for the people concerned.

Moreover, it is a broader issue with regard to environmental sustainability. The only factor that really has allowed Ireland to come within its Kyoto targets is economic circumstances, the drop in global demand and so on. However, it will come around again and Ireland will be poorly placed to meet the targets set by the broader European Union regarding environmental targets and CO2 emissions. The one area in which Ireland can and must make up some ground is the transport sector. It is a given that Ireland must sustain and develop agriculture because it is at the heart of the productivity of the country in respect of exports etc. Consequently, the transport sector is the area in which Ireland can make radical change in people’s behaviour to effect change. This taxation measure put before Members will push the country into reverse in respect of the sustainable environment. It is a highly retrograde step and this is the basis on which Fianna Fáil opposes it.

An Ceann Comhairle: Information on Seán Barrett  Zoom on Seán Barrett  Five speakers are offering but three minutes remain. I do not know whether Members wish to allow the Taoiseach to reply.

Deputy Dessie Ellis: Information on Dessie Ellis  Zoom on Dessie Ellis  In recent months, the abolition of the scrappage scheme has resulted in a decline in the number of new cars coming on the roads. This measure is another disincentive to people to buy new cars or to acquire environmentally friendly cars. This measure will cost jobs. Garages nationwide have been promoting cars with low CO2 emissions to ensure that people bought them. Consequently, this will cost such garages money in advertising, jobs and in other areas and will have a knock-on effect. It is short-sighted to levy so much money in addition to the taxes people already are paying.

Deputy Timmy Dooley: Information on Tim Dooley  Zoom on Tim Dooley  As spokesperson on transport, I am deeply concerned by this measure. On entering Government, the Taoiseach stated he would do things differently and there would be a new way of doing business. However, the old reliables are being hit again. When this measure is taken into consideration with the increase of VAT on fuel, its impact will be to make the transport sector significantly less competitive than its counterpart in Northern Ireland. While Ireland’s exports have been doing well, the Taoiseach will recognise the requirements placed on Irish exporters to gain access to the markets of Europe are greater because of the cost associated with transportation. This transportation will now cost more because of the increase in VAT on fuel, as well as the increase in tax on vehicles.

The Irish Road Haulage Association put forward a good proposal for a rebate scheme. Its adoption would have demonstrated the Government’s capacity to move on an imaginative proposal to deal with the issue of marked diesel, the impact on revenue lost to the State as a result of the cleansing of such diesel and its unscrupulous sale throughout the country, as well as the environmental impact of the dirty by-product arising from the cleansing of that diesel. [914] However, the Government has done nothing to take on board this measure. It clearly has not accepted this worthwhile proposal, which would have had a meaningful impact on the environment and which had the capacity to raise additional revenue for the State. The Government has ignored this proposal and is pushing ahead with what I believe will be an anti-competitive measure and is going back to relying on the old reliables.

The Government talks a lot about tourism and the Minister referred to it in his budget speech today. This measure is an attack on tourism because as the Taoiseach is aware, many tourists travel through the country on coaches and buses. Representatives of the coach tour business have been in touch with me. They are dismayed by the proposal on VAT and its impact on their ability to disperse tourists around the country. In their view, it will force tourists to remain in the cities, rather than dispersing throughout the country. This approach is highly anti-competitive and will affect the capacity to get exports and products from this State to the central markets of Europe. Moreover, it will have a negative impact on tourism. For this reason, I appeal to the Government to withdraw this measure and find some other way to raise the funds concerned.

An Ceann Comhairle: Information on Seán Barrett  Zoom on Seán Barrett  As the time for this resolution has expired, I now am required to put the following question in accordance with the order of the Dáil——

The Taoiseach: Information on Enda Kenny  Zoom on Enda Kenny  May I take a minute to respond?

Deputy Timmy Dooley: Information on Tim Dooley  Zoom on Tim Dooley  The Taoiseach should be given a minute.

An Ceann Comhairle: Information on Seán Barrett  Zoom on Seán Barrett  Okay, once Members know the time has expired.

The Taoiseach: Information on Enda Kenny  Zoom on Enda Kenny  The Minister, Deputy Hogan, has already commenced a review of the national climate strategy. As set out, we intend to meet the Kyoto targets here but it is important to know what it is we want before we legislate for it. That is reason we wanted to have the issue of the policy matters discussed.

The current proposal on motor tax takes into account the CO2 emissions with the lowest rate still applying. The industry is not going back to the point of producing bad cars and the incentive that was there is still there and it is well within the scope to take something from that which will go towards reducing the national debt——

Deputy Mattie McGrath: Information on Mattie McGrath  Zoom on Mattie McGrath  It is a betrayal.

The Taoiseach: Information on Enda Kenny  Zoom on Enda Kenny  ——and the Government still continues to support the local government fund. The principle of protecting the environmental incentive will be an important element of the review of VRT and motor tax, which will be carried out by the Minister next year.

For the information of Members, the climate change conference currently being held in Durban is examining the next phase of the global effort to reduce emissions after the period covered by the Kyoto Protocol. The Minister, Deputy Hogan, is in attendance at it with his colleagues from all over the world. There will be a strong effort to ensure there is a sufficient commitment by major global emitters to allow the EU to commit to ambitious targets post-2012.

Question put.

[915]The Dáil divided: Tá, 108; Níl, 52.

Information on James Bannon  Zoom on James Bannon  Bannon, James. Information on Tom Barry  Zoom on Tom Barry  Barry, Tom.
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Information on Bernard Durkan  Zoom on Bernard Durkan  Durkan, Bernard J. Information on Damien English  Zoom on Damien English  English, Damien.
Information on Alan Farrell  Zoom on Alan Farrell  Farrell, Alan. Information on Frank Feighan  Zoom on Frank Feighan  Feighan, Frank.
Information on Anne Ferris  Zoom on Anne Ferris  Ferris, Anne. Information on Frances Fitzgerald  Zoom on Frances Fitzgerald  Fitzgerald, Frances.
Information on Peter Fitzpatrick  Zoom on Peter Fitzpatrick  Fitzpatrick, Peter. Information on Charles Flanagan  Zoom on Charles Flanagan  Flanagan, Charles.
Information on Terence Flanagan  Zoom on Terence Flanagan  Flanagan, Terence. Information on Eamon Gilmore  Zoom on Eamon Gilmore  Gilmore, Eamon.
Information on Brendan Griffin  Zoom on Brendan Griffin  Griffin, Brendan. Information on Dominic Hannigan  Zoom on Dominic Hannigan  Hannigan, Dominic.
Information on Noel Harrington  Zoom on Noel Harrington  Harrington, Noel. Information on Simon Harris  Zoom on Simon Harris  Harris, Simon.
Information on Brian Hayes  Zoom on Brian Hayes  Hayes, Brian. Information on Tom Hayes  Zoom on Tom Hayes  Hayes, Tom.
Information on Martin Heydon  Zoom on Martin Heydon  Heydon, Martin. Information on Brendan Howlin  Zoom on Brendan Howlin  Howlin, Brendan.
Information on Heather Humphreys  Zoom on Heather Humphreys  Humphreys, Heather. Information on Kevin Humphreys  Zoom on Kevin Humphreys  Humphreys, Kevin.
Information on Derek Keating  Zoom on Derek Keating  Keating, Derek. Information on Colm Keaveney  Zoom on Colm Keaveney  Keaveney, Colm.
Information on Paul Kehoe  Zoom on Paul Kehoe  Kehoe, Paul. Information on Alan Kelly  Zoom on Alan Kelly  Kelly, Alan.
Information on Enda Kenny  Zoom on Enda Kenny  Kenny, Enda. Information on Seán Kenny  Zoom on Seán Kenny  Kenny, Seán.
Information on Seán Kyne  Zoom on Seán Kyne  Kyne, Seán. Information on Anthony Lawlor  Zoom on Anthony Lawlor  Lawlor, Anthony.
Information on Ciaran Lynch  Zoom on Ciaran Lynch  Lynch, Ciarán. Information on John Lyons  Zoom on John Lyons  Lyons, John.
Information on Michael McCarthy  Zoom on Michael McCarthy  McCarthy, Michael. Information on Shane McEntee  Zoom on Shane McEntee  McEntee, Shane.
Information on Nicky McFadden  Zoom on Nicky McFadden  McFadden, Nicky. Information on Dinny McGinley  Zoom on Dinny McGinley  McGinley, Dinny.
Information on Joe McHugh  Zoom on Joe McHugh  McHugh, Joe. Information on Tony McLoughlin  Zoom on Tony McLoughlin  McLoughlin, Tony.
Information on Michael McNamara  Zoom on Michael McNamara  McNamara, Michael. Information on Eamonn Maloney  Zoom on Eamonn Maloney  Maloney, Eamonn.
Information on Peter Mathews  Zoom on Peter Mathews  Mathews, Peter. Information on Mary Mitchell O'Connor  Zoom on Mary Mitchell O'Connor  Mitchell O’Connor, Mary.
Information on Olivia Mitchell  Zoom on Olivia Mitchell  Mitchell, Olivia. Information on Michelle Mulherin  Zoom on Michelle Mulherin  Mulherin, Michelle.
Information on Dara Murphy  Zoom on Dara Murphy  Murphy, Dara. Information on Eoghan Murphy  Zoom on Eoghan Murphy  Murphy, Eoghan.
Information on Gerald Nash  Zoom on Gerald Nash  Nash, Gerald. Information on Denis Naughten  Zoom on Denis Naughten  Naughten, Denis.
Information on Dan Neville  Zoom on Dan Neville  Neville, Dan. Information on Derek Nolan  Zoom on Derek Nolan  Nolan, Derek.
Information on Patrick Nulty  Zoom on Patrick Nulty  Nulty, Patrick. Information on Aodhán Ó Ríordán  Zoom on Aodhán Ó Ríordán  Ó Ríordáin, Aodhán.
Information on Kieran O'Donnell  Zoom on Kieran O'Donnell  O’Donnell, Kieran. Information on Patrick O'Donovan  Zoom on Patrick O'Donovan  O’Donovan, Patrick.
Information on Fergus O'Dowd  Zoom on Fergus O'Dowd  O’Dowd, Fergus. Information on John O'Mahony  Zoom on John O'Mahony  O’Mahony, John.
Information on Joe O'Reilly  Zoom on Joe O'Reilly  O’Reilly, Joe. Information on Jan O'Sullivan  Zoom on Jan O'Sullivan  O’Sullivan, Jan.
Information on Willie Penrose  Zoom on Willie Penrose  Penrose, Willie. Information on John Perry  Zoom on John Perry  Perry, John.
Information on Ann Phelan  Zoom on Ann Phelan  Phelan, Ann. Information on John Paul Phelan  Zoom on John Paul Phelan  Phelan, John Paul.
Information on Ruairí Quinn  Zoom on Ruairí Quinn  Quinn, Ruairí. Information on Pat Rabbitte  Zoom on Pat Rabbitte  Rabbitte, Pat.
Information on Dr James Reilly  Zoom on Dr James Reilly  Reilly, James. Information on Michael Ring  Zoom on Michael Ring  Ring, Michael.
Information on Brendan Ryan  Zoom on Brendan Ryan  Ryan, Brendan. Information on Alan Shatter  Zoom on Alan Shatter  Shatter, Alan.
Information on Sean Sherlock  Zoom on Sean Sherlock  Sherlock, Sean. Information on Róisín Shortall  Zoom on Róisín Shortall  Shortall, Róisín.
Information on Arthur Spring  Zoom on Arthur Spring  Spring, Arthur. Information on Emmet Stagg  Zoom on Emmet Stagg  Stagg, Emmet.
Information on David Stanton  Zoom on David Stanton  Stanton, David. Information on Billy Timmins  Zoom on Billy Timmins  Timmins, Billy.
Information on Joanna Tuffy  Zoom on Joanna Tuffy  Tuffy, Joanna. Information on Liam Twomey  Zoom on Liam Twomey  Twomey, Liam.
Information on Leo Varadkar  Zoom on Leo Varadkar  Varadkar, Leo. Information on Jack Wall  Zoom on Jack Wall  Wall, Jack.
Information on Brian Walsh  Zoom on Brian Walsh  Walsh, Brian. Information on Alex White  Zoom on Alex White  White, Alex.



Níl
Information on Gerry Adams  Zoom on Gerry Adams  Adams, Gerry. Information on Richard Boyd Barrett  Zoom on Richard Boyd Barrett  Boyd Barrett, Richard.
Information on Thomas P. Broughan  Zoom on Thomas P. Broughan  Broughan, Thomas P. Information on John Browne  Zoom on John Browne  Browne, John.
Information on Dara Calleary  Zoom on Dara Calleary  Calleary, Dara. Information on Joan Collins  Zoom on Joan Collins  Collins, Joan.
Information on Niall Collins  Zoom on Niall Collins  Collins, Niall. Information on Michael Colreavy  Zoom on Michael Colreavy  Colreavy, Michael.
Information on Barry Cowen  Zoom on Barry Cowen  Cowen, Barry. Information on Sean Crowe  Zoom on Sean Crowe  Crowe, Seán.
Information on Clare Daly  Zoom on Clare Daly  Daly, Clare. Information on Pearse Doherty  Zoom on Pearse Doherty  Doherty, Pearse.
Information on Stephen Donnelly  Zoom on Stephen Donnelly  Donnelly, Stephen S. Information on Tim Dooley  Zoom on Tim Dooley  Dooley, Timmy.
Information on Dessie Ellis  Zoom on Dessie Ellis  Ellis, Dessie. Information on Martin Ferris  Zoom on Martin Ferris  Ferris, Martin.
Information on Luke 'Ming' Flanagan  Zoom on Luke 'Ming' Flanagan  Flanagan, Luke ‘Ming’. Information on Seán Fleming  Zoom on Seán Fleming  Fleming, Sean.
Information on Tom Fleming  Zoom on Tom Fleming  Fleming, Tom. Information on Noel Grealish  Zoom on Noel Grealish  Grealish, Noel.
Information on John Halligan  Zoom on John Halligan  Halligan, John. Information on Seamus Healy  Zoom on Seamus Healy  Healy, Seamus.
Information on Michael Healy-Rae  Zoom on Michael Healy-Rae  Healy-Rae, Michael. Information on Joe Higgins  Zoom on Joe Higgins  Higgins, Joe.
Information on Billy Kelleher  Zoom on Billy Kelleher  Kelleher, Billy. Information on Seamus Kirk  Zoom on Seamus Kirk  Kirk, Seamus.
Information on Michael Kitt  Zoom on Michael Kitt  Kitt, Michael P. Information on Michael Lowry  Zoom on Michael Lowry  Lowry, Michael.
Information on Pádraig MacLochlainn  Zoom on Pádraig MacLochlainn  Mac Lochlainn, Pádraig. Information on Charlie McConalogue  Zoom on Charlie McConalogue  McConalogue, Charlie.
Information on Mary Lou McDonald  Zoom on Mary Lou McDonald  McDonald, Mary Lou. Information on Finian McGrath  Zoom on Finian McGrath  McGrath, Finian.
Information on Mattie McGrath  Zoom on Mattie McGrath  McGrath, Mattie. Information on John McGuinness  Zoom on John McGuinness  McGuinness, John.
Information on Sandra McLellan  Zoom on Sandra McLellan  McLellan, Sandra. Information on Micheál Martin  Zoom on Micheál Martin  Martin, Micheál.
Information on Michael Moynihan  Zoom on Michael Moynihan  Moynihan, Michael. Information on Catherine Murphy  Zoom on Catherine Murphy  Murphy, Catherine.
Information on Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin  Zoom on Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin  Ó Caoláin, Caoimhghín. Information on Éamon Ó Cuív  Zoom on Éamon Ó Cuív  Ó Cuív, Éamon.
Information on Seán Ó Fearghaíl  Zoom on Seán Ó Fearghaíl  Ó Fearghaíl, Seán. Information on Aengus O Snodaigh  Zoom on Aengus O Snodaigh  Ó Snodaigh, Aengus.
Information on Jonathan O'Brien  Zoom on Jonathan O'Brien  O’Brien, Jonathan. Information on Willie O'Dea  Zoom on Willie O'Dea  O’Dea, Willie.
Information on Maureen O'Sullivan  Zoom on Maureen O'Sullivan  O’Sullivan, Maureen. Information on Thomas Pringle  Zoom on Thomas Pringle  Pringle, Thomas.
Information on Shane Peter Nathaniel Ross  Zoom on Shane Peter Nathaniel Ross  Ross, Shane. Information on Brendan Smith  Zoom on Brendan Smith  Smith, Brendan.
Information on Brian Stanley  Zoom on Brian Stanley  Stanley, Brian. Information on Peadar Tóibín  Zoom on Peadar Tóibín  Tóibín, Peadar.
Information on Robert Troy  Zoom on Robert Troy  Troy, Robert. Information on Mick Wallace  Zoom on Mick Wallace  Wallace, Mick.

Tellers: Tá, Deputies Paul Kehoe and Emmet Stagg; Níl, Deputies Seán Ó Fearghaíl and Aengus Ó Snodaigh.

Question declared carried.


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